Starbucks
I just finished reading a book called "The Starbucks Experience" Most people who breathe know the success story of Seattle-based Coffee Giant Starbucks. While Starbucks has had a great marketing plan and growth strategy, the thing in my estimation, that has made it a movement and not just a coffee house, is the experience inside the doors.

I know, I know, many of you feel that the Starbucks of today is radically different than the Starbucks of yesterday. The coffee is still good, there is still an experience, but it is not what it was right? Starbucks like any movement has deal with and figure out the transition from passion to movement…from movement to machine…from machine to monument…and then if there is any energy left, from monument back to movement if possible.

The church has to deal with that as well. People will come in and receive an experience that transforms them, changes them, gives them hope. Then more people come, and more people come, and soon the experience naturally undergoes change because the people quotient, or the people dynamic necessitates that it change to address the needs of more people.

Here is where most movements become churches, and get stuck in the monument mode.. They need to re-structure their original experiences to accommodate the changing culture as they grow-and generally something is lost. Many do transition well, while there is some loss, the gain is even better.

In the book "The Starbucks Experience" I think they nail what it takes to create the experience with the 5 principles of the book:

1. Make It Your Own: Stop trying to copy someone else. You can’t deliver what they deliver and you probably don’t want to…Be you.

2. Everything Matters: This is even more true for a church. From the parking lot to the nursery. From paint colors to music choice…this sets the tone of the experience for people. Will the small things hinder or help people encounter God.

3. Surprise and Delight: In otherwords, leave them wanting more. Most churches over-sell and under deliver. I would say under sell and over deliver…your experience will multiply!

4. Embrace Resistance: Listen to what people are saying. Listen to their struggles. Listen to their dreams. They might be different from yours, but they will give you insight into the Holy Discontent that surrounds the church today like L.A smog. Consider how you can address and change that mind-set through your experience. Empower people to make a difference without a ton of red tape!

5. Leave Your Mark: Never let your church be an end in and of itself. The church exists with a prime directive to change the community and culture through grace, truth, mercy and love. Give back with no expectations and no agenda other than love.

Disney_castleThose are great experience makers…the next question is how do you sustain it over the long haul. Day in and day out. I remember when I was in Disneyland last summer  with my daughter Emma. We were standing in line (surprise, surprise!) and  I was listening to some of the Cast Members talk. In years past, the dialog between Cast members that I heard was always positive and upbeat, but on this day, it seemed that most every cast member was not exuding that Disney sparkle, rather they were tired and angry workers who couldn’t wait to get off shift or be somewhere else.

What once was an experience where customers and Cast Members were all transported to a different world, had become an amusement park that was cool, but had lost the Magic. Disney knows how to create magic and ethos…but now how do they sustain the movement without the nuances of everyday life creeping into the attitudes of the cast members?

In otherwords, what I am trying to say here is that every member of a church is critical to creating the experience . Just as a disgruntled Disney Cast Member can crush the mood of a wide-eyed customer…a disgruntled church member can run off people coming to experience God like a plague of locusts!

The church has the opportunity to create an experience that is more important than coffee and extreme rides…we create the experience that produces life change, transformation, eternal destination differences!

So…here ya go…how do we sustain a life transformational experience? What do you think we need to do. What creates and keeps the magic? Does it matter to you?

It matters to me because people matter to God.

Illuminate Deo,
Monty

7 Comments

  1. Monty,
    I think that when the recognizable challenges are overcome then I think the heart of a man deserts the church. I can become involved in a monument, but my heart isn’t behind it. I think that it’s because the monument doesn’t really need us to maintain itself. It is like a corporation, if one employee leaves, does any one notice? I think the adventure of risking something for the church really gets me going.

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  2. When we read the New Testiment, we often get the impression that the early church was a small, intimate affair. It was at first, but very quickly a large number believed. In Jerusalem alone, they had to pick seven guys to oversee the daily distribution of food for widows. There were many priests and temple servants that had believed, and it was soon impossible for all those believers to meet in one place because of the numbers involved. And yet the Holy Spirit continued to ignite the movement with passion and it spread like wildfire. Size does not need to be a limiting factor and neither does stucture. In my experience, both spiritually and corporately, what really limits an operation (or a movement)is the need to control…to own…to take credit.
    Once a pot starts to boil it will not stop until one of two things happen…it boils dry or the heat is removed. In our structures we need to be willing to let the heat roar and the water evoporate–the spirit is an ever-flowing fountain that will not run dry. And if we reduce the heat to a managable simmer instead of a boil the result is a hot tub, and hot tubs are for personal enjoyment not life change. They never boil….the bubbles are machine induced. They are safe, sane, and controlled by a thermostate. I agree with Nathan Tobey…the adventure is in the risk!

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  3. Embrace Resistance: Listen to what people are saying. Listen to their struggles. Listen to their dreams. They might be different from yours, but they will give you insight into the Holy Discontent that surrounds the church today like L.A smog. Consider how you can address and change that mind-set through your experience. Empower people to make a difference without a ton of red tape! Sherwood

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  4. Great post, it gives us a lot to think about. I think I am most inspired when God shows me the potentials, in people or churches, and I can get excited about being a part of growing and shaping that potential into reality. But when it comes to committing to that “experience,” I know about myself that the new idea and the original project is always more enticing and alluring… so, maybe, there are people for every stage, and components that depend on the right gifts at the right time… if so, where do I fit into SVA? Good things to think about… Thanks

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  5. Hey Monty– Len Sweet has a book recently published about how Starbucks models what the church should be doing. By the way, I’m living in Issaquah now. Let’s have coffee. BJBergfalk

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  6. Hey Monty– Len Sweet has a book recently published about how Starbucks models what the church should be doing. By the way, I’m living in Issaquah now. Let’s have coffee. BJBergfalk

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