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To The Secret Rose: Yeats

51Z3J68X8NL._SL500_AA300_ The sun is extremely hot today, filling the air with healing vitamin D and purging the body of all the water I have been retaining…so when I stole away a moment, I allowed my mind to find a cooler spot and absorb some words of William Butler Yeats. The poem/verse that arrested my scanning mind, wondering what to ponder over, was titled To The Secret Rose. Let me encourage you to find a quite space and read his words with your heart…

Monty

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To The Secret Rose

Far-off, most secret, and inviolate Rose,
Enfold me in my hour of hours; where those
Who sought thee in the Holy Sepulchre,
Or in the wine-vat, dwell beyond the stir
And tumult of defeated dreams; and deep
Among pale eyelids, heavy with the sleep
Men have named beauty. Thy great leaves enfold
The ancient beards, the helms of ruby and gold
Of the crowned Magi; and the king whose eyes
Saw the pierced Hands and Rood of elder rise
In druid vapour and make the torches dim;
Till vain frenzy awoke and he died; and him
Who met Fand walking among flaming dew
By a grey shore where the wind never blew,
And lost the world and Emir for a kiss;
And him who drove the gods out of their liss,
And till a hundred morns had flowered red
Feasted, and wept the barrows of his dead;
And the proud dreaming king who flung the crown
And sorrow away, and calling bard and clown
Dwelt among wine-stained wanderers in deep woods:
And him who sold tillage, and house, and goods,
And sought through lands and islands numberless years,
Until he found, with laughter and with tears,
A woman of so shining loveliness
That men threshed corn at midnight by a tress,
A little stolen tress. I, too, await
The hour of thy great wind of love and hate.
When shall the stars be blown about the sky,
Like the sparks blown out of a smithy, and die?
Surely thine hour has come, thy great wind blows,
Far-off, most secret, and inviolate Rose?

The Great Antecedent: A.W Tozer

Abstract light

I read and mediated on this Tozer piece this morning…. It comes from his book "The Divine Conquest" I have always said that God is always previous, that He is the first of all moves in life; Tozer ruminates on this as looks at the "unbeginning One." Grab some coffee (Tozer blend ) read, and ask yourself just how large a concept of God do you have, how you experience Him is limited by your concept of Him.

Monty

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The Great Antecedent

For all things God is the great Antecedent. Because He is, we
are and everything else is. He is that "dread, unbeginning One,"
self-caused, self-contained and self-sufficient. Faber saw this when he
wrote his great hymn in celebration of God's eternity.

Thou hast no youth, great God,

An Unbeginning End Thou art;

Thy glory in itself abode,

And still abides in its own tranquil heart:

No age can heap its outward years on Thee:

Dear God! Thou art Thyself Thine own eternity.

Do not skip this as merely another poem. The difference between a
great Christian life and any other kind lies in the quality of our
religious concepts, and the ideas expressed in these six lines can be
like rungs on Jacob's ladder, leading upward to a sounder and more
satisfying idea of God.

We cannot think rightly of God until we begin to think of Him as
always being there, and there first. Joshua had this to learn. He had
been so long the servant of God's servant Moses, and had with such
assurance received God's word at his mouth, that Moses and the God of
Moses had become blended in his thinking, so blended that he could
hardly separate the two thoughts; by association they always appeared
together in his mind. Now Moses is dead, and lest the young Joshua be
struck down with despair, God spoke to assure him, "As I was with Moses,
so I will be with thee." Moses was dead, but the God of Moses still
lived. Nothing had changed and nothing had been lost. Nothing of God
dies when a man of God dies.

"As I was—so I will be." Only God could say this. Only the Eternal
One could stand in the timeless I AM and say, "I was" and "I will be."

Verse

"No one will be able to stand up against you all the days of
your life. As I was with Moses, so I will be with; I will never leave
you nor forsake you." Joshua 1:5

Thought

We cannot think rightly of God until we begin to think of Him
as always being there, and there first.

Prayer

Let us think rightly of You, Lord, by realizing that You have
always been there and that You were there first.

A.B. Simpson devotional

Days of Heaven on Earth

Monday, May 03, 2010

Here lies the secret of abiding peace-God's
peace. We give ourselves to God and the Holy Spirit takes possession of
our hearts. It is indeed "Peace, peace." But it is at this precise point
that the devil begins to interfere, and he does it through our
thoughts, diverting or distracting them as the occasion requires.

This is the time to prove the sincerity of our consecration and the
singleness of our hearts. If we truly desire His presence more than
anything, we will turn away from every conflicting thought and look
steadily up to Jesus. But if we desire the gratification of our impulses
more than His presence, we will yield to the passionate word, or the
frivolous thought, or the sinful diversion. Then when we come back, our
Shepherd has gone, and we wonder why our peace has departed.

Failure occurs often in some insignificant thing-usually a thought or
word. The soul that would not fear to climb a mountain may actually
stumble over a straw.

The real secret of perfect rest is to be jealously, habitually
occupied with Jesus.

Scripture

My peace I give unto you—John 14:27